Prospective BS in Nutrition & Food Science

The Nutrition and Food Science program prepares students for a professional career in the field by exposing them to the theoretical foundations and practical skills involved in the various disciplines of the specialty. The Department offers a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (BS) in Nutrition and Food Science.

The objective of this program is to prepare students for careers in the clinical sciences with particular emphasis on nutrition and food technologies. The program covers the biological, chemical, and physical principles of processing, packaging and storing raw agricultural products into processed forms suitable for consumption.

Graduates will be prepared to enter research and technical positions in the health sciences mainly in food research and development of innovative foods or in food quality control and quality assurance, two laboratory-based fields.

This emphasis also prepares students for numerous roles in basic, advanced and therapeutic nutrition, food chemistry, agricultural products processing, food additives, food preparation and packaging, food storage and shipment, related aspects of human health and safety including toxicology and pathology and the development of innovative foods, diets and lifestyles.

Graduates can also work in dietetics, food or food supplements sales and marketing, which may be office-based or client contact-based.

Graduates can also pursue postgraduate studies in nutritional immunology, dietetics or food technologies that can further develop research and technical skills.

 

 
 
TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS FOR GRADUATION (105 credits)
COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS (18 credits)
CODE DESCRIPTION PREREQUISITE CR.
CSI 200 Computer Literacy ENG 001
3
ENG 201 Composition & Rhetoric I ENG 200
3
ENG 202 Composition & Rhetoric II ENG 201
3
ENG 205 English Communication Skills ENG 202
3
HMS 201 Active Learning & Research Methodology ENG 001
3
HMS 301 Western Civilization ENG 201
3
FREE LIBERAL ARTS ELECTIVES (6 credits)
That include Sociology and Psychiatry
GENERAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS (25 credits)
CODE DESCRIPTION PREREQUISITE CR.
BIO 210 Cells & Molecules ENG 001
3
BIO 213 Introduction To Physiology ENG 001
3
BIO 310 Introduction To Microbiology BIO 210
3
BIO 320 Biostatistics & Epidemiology MAT 200 & ENG 001 & CSI 200
3
BIO210L Cells & Molecules Laboratory Co. BIO 210
1
BIO213L Introduction To Physiology Laboratory Co. BIO 213
1
CHE 205 Chemical Principles & Analysis ENG 001
3
CHE 210 Organic Chemistry I CHE 205
3
CHE 220 Introduction To Biochemistry CHE 210
3
CHE 320 Analytical Chemistry CHE 205
3
CHE205L Chemical Analysis Laboratory Co. CHE 205
1
CHE210L Organic Chemistry Lab Co. CHE 210
1
CHE320L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Co. CHE 320
1
NUTRITION & FOOD SCIENCE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
CODE DESCRIPTION PREREQUISITE CR.
CLS 470 Process of Research ENG 202
1
NFS 201 Human Nutrition I BIO 210
3
NFS 210 Principles of Food Science ENG 001
3
NFS 220 Food Processing NFS 210
3
NFS 230 Food Chemistry CHE 205
3
NFS230L Food Chemistry Laboratory Co. NFS 230
1
NFS 240 Nutrition in the Food Cycle NFS 201
3
NFS 260 Community Nutrition NFS 201
3
NFS 301 Human Nutrition II NFS 201
3
NFS 310 Food Microbiology BIO 210
3
NFS310L Food Microbiology Laboratory Co. NFS 310
1
NFS 330 Food Analysis NFS 230
3
NFS330L Food Analysis Laboratory Co. NFS 330
1
NFS 350 Food Product Development NFS 210
3
NFS 360 Therapeutic Nutrition I3 NFS 301
3
NFS 420 Food Laws, Regulations and Quality Control NFS 210
3
NFS 460 Therapeutic Nutrition II NFS 360
3
NFS 499 Practicum: Internship in Food Technology and Nutrition Senior Standing
3
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (6 credits)
CODE DESCRIPTION PREREQUISITE CR.
CLS 494 Chromatography CHE 210
3
CLS 495 Instrumental Chemistry CHE 205
3
CLS 497 Toxicology BIO 213 & CHE 220
3
Course Descriptions
CSI 200
Computer Literacy
This course is an introductory Non-Technical survey of Computer Systems and a study of the social impact of computers. Topics include introduction to the Hardware components of a computer system, input and output devices, storage devices, communications and connectivity, Internet, security, information systems and deep exposition to software applications such as text editors, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENG 001
ENG 201
Composition & Rhetoric I
This is the students' first major encounter with critical thinking, reading, and writing. Students are exposed to themes from different disciplines and are expected to discuss them, read and write about them. The essay of all its types is the writing format dealt with in the first half. A research paper, 5-10 pages in length, follows in the second half.
Prerequisite: ENG 200
ENG 202
Composition & Rhetoric II
In this course, students are expected to engage in deep critical thinking and to construct written arguments in which they decide on a controversial issue. They are helped to think of argument in terms of having an opinion, voicing it persuasively, and supporting it adequately. Hence, they will be analyzing debatable issues appearing in writing and will be introduced to the elements and structure of argument, including the Toulmin model, the rhetorical situation, the traditional categories of claims, the types of proof, logical fallacies and the Rogerian argument. Reading, critical thinking, and writing are taught as integrated processes. There will be essays for analysis, as well as essay topics for development.
Prerequisite: ENG 201
ENG 205
English Communication Skills
Students' communication competence is enhanced by learning the techniques and strategies of public speaking. No other skills are so closely tied to a student's professional success as communication skills. Using what they have learned in other English language courses, students practice and communicate, guided by the fundamental principles of public speaking, and provided with a forum for applying these principles, through a variety of instructional strategies - discussion, class workshops.
Prerequisite: ENG 202
HMS 201
Active Learning & Research Methodology

This is an introductory course that aims at bridging the gap between school and college and develops the student's skills in three areas related to active learning and research methodology. In the first area, the student is introduced to the university's rules and regulations and general guidelines. In the second area, the student hones his/her study skills, namely, developing schedules, improving concentration, developing time-saving test-taking strategies, taking good notes, improving listening and reading skills, and applying strategies to avoid test anxiety. In the third area, the student is introduced to research, armed with the theory, methodology, and techniques of the research process, starting with conceptualization and ending with report writing.

Prerequisite: ENG 001
HMS 301
Western Civilization
This course consists of readings and discussion of the classic great books of Western Civilization, focusing on literary, philosophical, and historical works from ancient Greece and Rome. Readings will be selected from authors such as Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Herodotus, Thucydides, Livy, Tacitus, Plutarch, Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Epicurus, Cicero, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Plotinus, and Augustine.
Prerequisite: ENG 201
BIO 210
Cells & Molecules
This course deals with cells and their molecules. Its main goal is to provide knowledge on the basics of the cell structure and function, with emphasis on the evolution and chemistry of the cell, membranes, organelles and cytoskeleton, cell signaling and regulation, and the flow of genetic information.
Prerequisite: ENG 001
BIO 213
Introduction To Physiology
This is an introductory course to Medical Physiology. Its objective is to offer to the student a general introduction into the basic aspects of physiology. The material covered in the course can be used as stand-alone, or to lead on to more detailed studies of physiology. The course will take a largely systemic approach to the study of the human body. Emphasis is on the function, regulation and integration of organs and organ systems of higher animals emphasizing human physiology.
Prerequisite: ENG 001
BIO 310
Introduction To Microbiology
This course presents the basic principles of medical microbiology. It includes bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic classifications, structure, metabolism, genetics, regulatory mechanisms, growth and replication. General principles of pathogenicity, epidemiology, mechanisms of antimicrobial therapy, sterilization, disinfections and antisepsis, and laboratory diagnosis are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: BIO 210
BIO 320
Biostatistics & Epidemiology
This is an introductory course in the basics of biostatistics and epidemiology. Type sand sources of data in measuring population health, data analysis and descriptive epidemiology will be included. The course covers both theory and applications in the form of problem solving and laboratory sessions.
Prerequisite: MAT 200 & ENG 001 & CSI 200
BIO210L
Cells & Molecules Laboratory
This is a laboratory course that deals with a selection of common techniques used in cell and molecular biology. This course should provide hands-on practical applications for topics discussed in the BIO 210 course in and experimental approach.
Prerequisite: Co. BIO 210
BIO213L
Introduction To Physiology Laboratory
This course consists of a set of exercises accompanied by experiments, models and computer simulations designed to provide students with a better understanding of the structure and function of the human body.
Prerequisite: Co. BIO 213
CHE 205
Chemical Principles & Analysis
This course provides an overview of analytical techniques in chemistry including aqueous solution chemistry, activities and activity coefficients, equilibrium calculations, complex acid-base systems, voltametry, gravimetric and electrogravimetric analyses, titrimetric analyses, colorimetric methods and separation methods.
Prerequisite: ENG 001
CHE 210
Organic Chemistry I
This is an introductory course to organic chemistry. It offers an introduction to common classes of organic compounds including their nomenclature, structure, bonding, reactivity and spectroscopic characterization.
Prerequisite: CHE 205
CHE 220
Introduction To Biochemistry
An introductory course in biochemistry. Its objective is to offer to the student a firsthand description of the principles and practices of biochemistry. Students will be exposed to the basic structures of major classes of biologically important molecules and metabolic activities of major importance in living organisms.
Prerequisite: CHE 210
CHE 320
Analytical Chemistry
This course is intended to give participants an overview of analytical techniques in chemistry including aqueous solution chemistry, activities and activity coefficients, equilibrium calculations, complex acid-base systems, voltammetry, gravimetric and electrogravimetric analyses, titrimetric analyses, colorimetric methods, separation methods, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, atomic absorption, chromatography methods and tandem methods.
Prerequisite: CHE 205
CHE205L
Chemical Analysis Laboratory
A laboratory course to teach students several common chemistry techniques. Emphasis is placed on experimental topics related to topics discussed in CHE 205.
Prerequisite: Co. CHE 205
CHE210L
Organic Chemistry Lab
A laboratory course which deals with a selection of common basic organic chemistry techniques.
Prerequisite: Co. CHE 210
CHE320L
Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
At the end of this practical course, the student should have hands-on experience of separation methods and with the most advanced GC, HPLC, GC-MS and HPLC-MS techniques as qualitative and quantitative tools for chemistry, environmental and toxicology analysis.
Prerequisite: Co. CHE 320
CLS 470
Process of Research
This course is designed to familiarize students with research and scientific reporting techniques. Students will learn how to obtain information regarding a specific subject using various resources, rate the obtained results in terms of credibility and report their findings including citation of references in a standard format. Students will also learn how to prepare to present their results in a PowerPoint or poster format.
Prerequisite: ENG 202
NFS 201
Human Nutrition I
This course provides an integrated overview of the physiological requirements and functions of protein, energy, and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. The course topics tackle dietary sources, intake levels, physiological role, and requirement of major nutrients. It also covers the biological determinants of nutrient requirements and the assessment of nutrient status in individuals and populations.
Prerequisite: BIO 210
NFS 210
Principles of Food Science
This is a general introductory course in food science that deals with the aspects of food preservation and processing, food safety, food additives, food legislation and regulation.
Prerequisite: ENG 001
NFS 220
Food Processing
Principles, technologies, and applications involved in conversion of raw products into high quality foods. Processing principles such as thermal processing, irradiation, freezing, membrane concentration, enzyme technologies, dehydration and refrigeration.
Prerequisite: NFS 210
NFS 230
Food Chemistry
Organic and biological reactions of food constituents. Chemical changes in foods during processing and storage affecting texture, color, flavor, stability and nutritive qualities.
Prerequisite: CHE 205
NFS230L
Food Chemistry Laboratory
Chemical changes in food constituents which affect stability of food products and properties such as color, flavor and texture.
Prerequisite: Co. NFS 230
NFS 240
Nutrition in the Food Cycle
This course includes human nutrition, introduction to therapeutic and modified diets, nutrition in healthcare through the life cycle and drug-nutrient interactions, nutritional assessment and analysis.  It includes a study of nutritional requirements from conception to senescence The course also covers gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and endocrine systems as related to medical nutrition therapy. 
Prerequisite: NFS 201
NFS 260
Community Nutrition
The course encompasses the study of the roles and resources of community/public health nutrition professionals promoting wellness in the community. It entails the assessment of community nutritional needs, and planning, implementing and evaluating nutrition education programs for various age groups under different socio-economic conditions. The legislative process, health care insurance industry, and domestic food assistance programs will also be emphasized.
Prerequisite: NFS 201
NFS 301
Human Nutrition II
This is an advanced course in human nutrition The course discusses the role of nutrition in growth and health through the life cycle. It provides in-depth information on the rationale for the development of dietary guidelines and of nutrition policies in different countries. The course concludes by emphasizing the role of diet in the development of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, etc.
Prerequisite: NFS 201
NFS 310
Food Microbiology
Major groups of microorganisms of importance to the food industry. Emphasis on ecological, physiological, and public health aspects.
Prerequisite: BIO 210
NFS310L
Food Microbiology Laboratory
Methods for studying major groups of microorganisms important to food industry. Isolation, enumeration, characterization, identification and use of microorganisms. SA: MPH 441.
Prerequisite: Co. NFS 310
NFS 330
Food Analysis
Principles and applications of analytical techniques. Analysis for fats, proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins and additives. Techniques include spectroscopy, fluorimetry, chromatography, electrophoresis, and proximate composition.
Prerequisite: NFS 230
NFS330L
Food Analysis Laboratory
Survey of analytical analysis of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, minerals, vitamins and additives. Techniques include spectroscopy, fluorimetry, chromatography, electrophoresis, and proximate composition.
Prerequisite: Co. NFS 330
NFS 350
Food Product Development
Food product development including obtaining, screening and selection of ideas. Integration of food processing, chemistry, analysis and microbiology for the design, production, and evaluation of a food product.
Prerequisite: NFS 210
NFS 360
Therapeutic Nutrition I3
Course content includes: nutrients, digestion, utilization of food, needs across the life cycle, food preferences and customs, dietary guidelines, nutritional deficiency and excess, diet modifications, working with patients/residents with special needs, nutritional assessments and care plans.
Prerequisite: NFS 301
NFS 420
Food Laws, Regulations and Quality Control
Adoption, interpretation, and enforcement of laws and regulations governing food processing and foodservice systems. Impact of regulation on food production, availability, marketing, safety. The course places emphasis on the theory and application of quality assurance programs for food processing industries and the accreditation of food technology laboratories procedures.
Prerequisite: NFS 210
NFS 460
Therapeutic Nutrition II
This course deals with the provision of nutrients to maintain and/ or restore optimal nutrition and health. Therapeutic diets may be required as therapy for a disease or to treat malnutrition arising from low energy and nutrient intakes or due to increased energy and nutrient needs. 
Prerequisite: NFS 360
NFS 499
Practicum: Internship in Food Technology and Nutrition
Twelve weeks of supervised experience in selected areas related to the field. 
Prerequisite: Senior Standing
CLS 494
Chromatography
This course provides an introduction to chromatography beginning with the use of non-instrumental chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques for the separation of components in a mixture, progressing to instrumental chromatography (Gas Chromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography).
Prerequisite: CHE 210
CLS 495
Instrumental Chemistry
At the end of this course, the student should have an extensive understanding of the fundamentals of physical chemistry of chromatography and the most advanced instrumental chemistry techniques such as electrophoresis separation techniques, GC, HPLC, GC-MS and HPLC-MS as qualitative and quantitative tools for chemistry, environmental, toxicology and forensic analysis. The student will also acquire vast knowledge of atomic and molecular spectroscopy and the application of atomic absorption for trace and heavy metals analysis.
Prerequisite: CHE 205
CLS 497
Toxicology
This course is designed to introduce students to the broad discipline of toxicology. Basic principles of toxicology and their applications to the understanding of xenobiotic-induced target organ toxicology will be presented in this course. Lecture topics on basic principles relating to toxicant exposure routes; dose-response relationships in toxicity; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of toxicants; and chemical carcinogenesis & mutagenesis will provide a foundation on which the remainder of the course will be built. The course reflects on the interactions between toxicants and biological systems from a basic science approach.
Prerequisite: BIO 213 & CHE 220

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